Description

We're thrilled to have our first Marchione in the shop! Texas-based master luthier Stephen Marchione builds archtops, classical guitars, electric and acoustic guitars, even violins. Yes, violins. He utilizes his knowledge of both classical and jazz construction in each guitar he makes and the results are nothing short of stunning. His clients include Paul Simon, Leni Stern, Mark Knopfler, Vernon Reid, and John Abercrombie to name a few. 

This Vintage Tremolo model is Stephen's take on the classic S-style solid body. Visually, this guitar reminds us a bit of a sophisticated, LA-session player's super Strat - something that would be right at home in Larry Carlton or Pete Thorn's collection. This is a hot-rodded feeling guitar along the lines of a Suhr or Tom Anderson, but with some added magic that Marchione guitars are known for.

What is that magic you ask? Effortless playability, flawless build quality, a lively, super resonant feel....and the tones? Huge. This is the guitar you can take to a gig, jam, or session and truly cover most of the bases. Need LP heft? Use the bridge pickup, done. Bell-like Strat chime? Positions 2&4 will get you there and then some. Texas blues neck position tones? Done. This is such a fat, articulate, killer sounding Strat that makes you wonder why so many Strats end up sounding so thin and lifeless. 

There are subtle but useful touches such as master volume / master tone setup, the location of the 5-way pickup selector...coupled with a jet-black ebony board, stainless frets, and a really stable Wilkinson bridge, you've got a really versatile, inspiring Strat that is every bit as good as some of the aforementioned names, and is in many respects (cough cough) better. Priced with original hardshell case. 

On consignment, no trades please. 

Specs

  • Lightweight Swamp Ash body
  • Sugar Maple neck
  • African Ebony fingerboard
  • Stainless Steel fretwire
  • Custom Marchione pickups and electronics
  • Sperzel Tuners and Wilkinson Bridge
  • Condition: Mint / near mint

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